528-Tetra

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Tapatia occidentalis

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© All rights reserved
Guenter Ellenberg

 

All translations into English by Matthias Naumann, Germany and Bill Kohler, Ohio-USA  

Goodea

JORDAN, 1880

Xenendum JORDAN & SNYDER, 1900

There is some confusionconcerning the correct classification of the forms belonging to this genus. Either they are considered to be independent species, or are classified as subspecies of Goodea atripinnis. In this publication we consider Goodea atripinnis to be the only species. Further scientific research may clear the classification of the forms some day.

So 1 species belongs to the genus Goodea; making the genus monotypic. Of all the goodeid species Goodea has the largest area of distribution.

These are big, silvery fish, which have an imposing effect because of their peaceful and quiet character. They attract attention with their massive bodies and with the position of the dorsal and anal fins placed far back, as well as with their deep oral fissure and numerous gill clefts. Although there is a large amount of variability in both the body shape and colouration, today all formsare classified as Goodea atripinnis.

Apart from the fact that Goodea does not care for soft or acid water - like all Goodeids -,  maintenance is easy. It is advised that these fish should not be kept too warm in order to keep problems from happening when breeding over several generations. Variation in water temperature is desirable for almost all fish that do not originate from the tropics and Goodea is no exception.

Goodea also serves as food for the local Mexican population and so these fish are caught with nets.